Making up Pyramids.

Enigmatic things are pyramids – capturing the imagination and the tourist pound, if there is a chance of making an argument for having a pyramid on your doorstep, few would skip out on the chance to tell that story. Few examples illustrate this better than the pyramids of Güímar. Found in Tenerife, this heavily invested archaeological site invites visitors to surrender a hefty sum of money at the door, in order to explore this, no doubt interesting, ‘pyramid complex’.

If you are in no mood to start scratching at the surface of this site, you would be forgiven for accepting that these are indeed evidence of a complex society, developing pyramidal structures, aligned perfectly for solstice based events – for who knows what form of mystical rituals or ceremonies. Of course, that is only half of the story.

The site does recognise in it’s interpretation that there is an alternative narrative to be had here. While one argument is presented that makes the case for this being a prehistoric site of world significance, the other story is one of 19th century farming structures, the likes of which you can see scattered all over the country. Both can be found in the on site literature, however, in terms of the spin, there is little doubt as to where this ‘museum’ has invested its interests.

For the museum/business at Güímar, this is almost certainly a site of prehistoric importance. They recognise of course that there is no evidence to support such a theory, apart from wild comparative inferences that requires no physical archaeological data to support the argument, yet there is no institutional reservation about spinning the story.

Visit this site, and you will enjoy some fine scenery, and some impressively well preserved, though abandoned, 19th century farmsteads. You will most certainly not find yourself in the middle of a complex prehistoric spiritual landscape. But take the on site interpretation on face value alone, and you would be forgiven for coming away thinking just that.

A site to be treated with extreme caution.

 

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